What Are You Reading ?

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10 years 2 months ago #1 by ConcertForGeorgeNut
What Are You Reading ? was created by ConcertForGeorgeNut
Share with us what you're reading at the moment.

The other day, I listened to a song I hadn't heard in some years - Bright Eyes, performed by Art Garfunkel, and from the movie/animation called Watership Down.

Have just been into YouTube to find the video to the song, and really enjoyed reading some of the comments about the book. Later today, I'm off to the library to pick it up.

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10 years 1 month ago #2 by ConcertForGeorgeNut
Replied by ConcertForGeorgeNut on topic What Are You Reading ?
Of Mice And Men - John Steinbeck

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10 years 1 month ago #3 by Memsahib
Replied by Memsahib on topic What Are You Reading ?
Nobody True, by James Herbert

James Herbert, who writes in the science fiction/fantasy genre, often chooses very uncomfortable subjects. This book is no exception, but I'll be damned if I can put it down!

It is about a young advertising executive, James True, who regularly has out of body experiences, often at will, often while asleep. The crunch comes when he returns to his body one night to find it dead. The plot has some great twists and turns, and the doulbe entendre in the title becomes clear as the story evolves. I'm only half way through it and can't wait to see where it goes.

If you like thrillers with some fantasy thrown in, and can deal with the occasional macabre or gory turn, then I strongly recommend this book. It's till on sale - I got it on special from an Angus and Robertson factory outlet for only $6.99. A bargain!

Cheers
Mem

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10 years 3 weeks ago #4 by ConcertForGeorgeNut
Replied by ConcertForGeorgeNut on topic What Are You Reading ?
Summer of the Seventeenth Doll - Ray Lawler.

This was given to me as a Christmas present, but I've only just got round to reading it over the last few days.

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9 years 4 months ago - 9 years 4 months ago #5 by sozzled
Replied by sozzled on topic What Are You Reading ?
I'm currently reading a small book called More Frantic Semantics: Further Adventures in Modern English by John Morrish. The book is a collection of articles gathered from the British Saturday Telegraph Magazine column. The book is only 150 pages, each page is devoted to the derivation of a modern English word. I rather liked the article about the word pukka:

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Pukka

When the chef Jamie Oliver first appeared on the television he looked about fifteen. But he had an oddly antique vocabulary. Not only was everything in his kitchen ‘wicked’ and ‘crucial’, it was also ‘pukka’.

`Pukka’ means ‘authentic’ or ‘genuine’, although young Jamie used it simply as a term of approval. It is quite unusual these days, cropping up mainly in old-fashioned contexts where no one feels embarrassed by its imperial overtones. You see it in the City pages and in sports reports. You used to hear it a lot in It Ain’t Half Hot , Mum, one of the few programmes the BBC seems reluctant to repeat.

As all of this suggests, ‘pukka’ is an Anglo-Indian term, derived from the Hindi pakka and appearing first in English at the end of the seventeenth century. The Hindi word means ‘mature’, ‘cooked’ or ‘solid’.

It was often balanced by its opposite, cutcha, meaning `raw’ or ,unripe’, notably in local systems of weights, which came in two versions, the ‘pakka’ and the ‘cutcha’, just as we once had pounds troy and pounds avoirdupois and now pints and litres on the same supermarket shelves.

For building, mud and timber were ‘cutcha’ materials, whereas kiln-fired bricks and mortar were ‘pakka’. Similarly, permanent things and people came to be called ‘pakka’ or ‘pukka’. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, it spread across the English-speaking world, like pyjama and bungalow, but unlike them it has never totally lost its subcontinental aura.

It tends to be used faintly ironically, for its historical connotations: people might praise an Indian restaurant for its ‘pukka’ food, or suggest that someone born on a tea plantation would bring ‘pukka’ management to a tarnished organisation.

Sometimes you read that someone whose speech is redolent of the old BBC Empire Service has a ‘pukka accent’. No one would make that mistake about Jamie Oliver, however. He seems to have taken elocution lessons from Mick Jagger.
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Just the kind of word that you would expect a 'memsahib' to use, no?

If you think I'm wrong then say "I think you're wrong". If you say, "You're wrong", how do you know?
Last edit: 9 years 4 months ago by sozzled.

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